Posted in Blog, Mental Health, Reviews

Review – I Forget to Stay Sober by J.T. Wahlberg

If I had to sum this book up in one word that word would be honest. There was no fluff, no pity party, no excuses; just pure vulnerable honesty.

Not only does J.T. share how stupid he was (his words not mine ; I think he was brave) but he shares why he got sober the stupid way. The stupid way was trying to do it alone. The body becomes so reliant on alcohol that withdrawing incorrectly can kill you. J.T. found that out the hard way (and I think we are all glad that it didn’t kill him). There are detox centers that will help you to carefully and safely get sober.

When J.T. did make it through the initial process of getting sober he had to get back to life – work. He shares how he was able to make it through the first shift, then the next and continuing in career in the hospitality business (where he had to be around alcohol nearly everyday). The system of counting to seven and forgetting to get drunk worked well for him; and perhaps it could help you as well.

Finally, one of the most interesting pieces in the book was when J.T. writes about having to decline a drink when socializing. Since alcohol is a normalized part of society when someone declines a drink they are often questioned. We need to normalize not drinking.

This book is definitely worth the read, whether you are struggling with your alcohol consumption or if you love someone who is struggling. This book not only talks about the process but the feelings that he had to deal with and why he continued for so long.

If you prefer to listen it is on audible (that is how I listened to the book) and J.T. reads it, which I find it extra special to hear his voice telling his story.

If you would like to read the book please consider using my affiliate link here.

Posted in Blog, Mental Health, Reviews

Review – The Weight of Air by David Poses

Ever look at someone and think “yup they are an addict”? Ever think to yourself that you can always tell who is or is not an addict? If you have then this book will blow your mind because you can’t just look at someone and know if they are struggling with an addiction.

David shares his very personal story of leading a secret life of sneaking away to get high, going to work and having a stable intimate relationship. He shares how early on in his struggle his parents knew he had an addiction and he went to rehab. Then he shares how he continued getting high all while pretending he wasn’t.

This story is raw, honest and gives you a real glimpse into the life of someone who is struggling. Not just struggling with their addiction but struggling with who they are as a person. Struggling with living in their own skin.

The courage it took David to share his story shows through the entire book. Keeping the reader involved and wanting to see how it turns out. A little spoiler…. it turns out well.

If you are interested in reading David’s story please consider using my affiliate link here.

Posted in Blog, Mental Health, Reviews

Review: Yoga Cocaine by Daralyse Lyons

This is not the type of book I would normally pick up but I loved it and wanted to see how the main character’s life wouldB081W8SBVR end up. I am happy to say that I have not had to deal with drug addiction but I still felt a deep connection with this book and the struggle of the main character to get her life together. The struggle of failure and the fight to get some semblance of normalcy and happiness.

The book is written in a way that follows the 12-step program which was such an interesting structure. The other main topic of the book was incorporating yoga into recovery. I connected with this portion of the book so much that during one of my yoga flows I cried. Releasing some of the trauma that I had stored, the same way it was described in the book.

If you know someone who is struggling this is a book that you need to read. It will give you some understanding of what they may be going through and the thoughts of self-hatred. Addiction is not a choice that people make. It is a mental health illness that needs serious and long-term help and understanding.

If you are interested in getting your own copy, please consider using my affiliate link.

Posted in Blog, Mental Health, Reviews

Review: Where the Light Shines by Kelly Inviere

I love poetry and have written quite a bit of it over the years. It was my main coping mechanism during my teenage years when I didn’t think that I could go on. That was how I compiled my first book Thoughts of a Wanderer and even added in some poetry to my mostWhere the Light Shines Through: A Memoir in Poetry by [Kelly Inviere] recent book. The point is I love poetry.

And the book Where the Light Shines by Kelly Inviere is a book of poetry. She uses poetry much in the same way that I did to cope with some difficult and traumatizing times in her life. She does a fantastic job!

Poetry is a very fluid form of expression and there are many ways to write it. Personally, using some type of rhyming scheme is a must. Which is a big positive for this book as Kelly incorporates various strategies of rhyming. It is an easy read but a heartfelt and deep dive read. The more poems that you read the more you can see how the story of her life unfolds. It is a very unique way to write an autobiography and it was a pleasure to read.

If you are interested in getting your own copy, please consider using my affiliate link. 

Posted in Blog, Reviews

The Vicious Game by Derek Scarzella

Right from the start I was hooked into the life of one of the main characters. The scene was set through dialogue and observations which let the reader get right to the story. There are two story lines throughout the book which shows two sides of the same coin. It was interesting to see this contrast between the two plots that were interconnected and yet weren’t. Most times I wouldn’t think that would work in a story but it did for this one.

I won’t give away any spoilers but I will say that at the end I was shocked. It was wrapped up nicely and I must say that the characters got what was coming to them.

However, as this was the first novel written by Derek Scarzella there could have been some better formatting choices. Overall, the story was to the point and I enjoyed it. It was an easy read (though not for anyone who is uptight about language or sexuality). The only real problem I had with it was that at times in the middle of a chapter the story would change scenes without notice and I would have to do a double take to readjust my visuals (I like to see the story play out in my head).

Many books will do this shift in scene or even a time lapse but they will utilize some type of formatting technique to make it clear to the reader. Usually some asterisks ***** in-between the paragraphs. I don’t hold this against Derek and it would be something that he can easily incorporate into future novels.

If you would like to get your hands on this book, please consider using my affiliate link HERE.